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Bedtime Stories - Tales from Our Commmunity

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Elijah Bailey
Elijah Bailey

Buy A Whale !!LINK!!


You'll receive through the mail a personalized certificate with a photograph, biography and family tree of the adopted whale, fascinating facts and figures about humpback whales, a map of the migratory path of the humpback whale you adopted, a window decal/sticker, monthly updates and recent WDC newsletters including updates on where the adopted whale has been seen and how this adoption is helping to save whales and dolphins worldwide. PLUS an exciting and educational DVD featuring WDC adoptable humpback whales.




buy a whale


DOWNLOAD: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftweeat.com%2F2uhPlV&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw0KOVfoY0_6o4S8X90OjtHg



You'll receive through the mail a personalized certificate with a photograph, biography and family tree of the adopted whale, fascinating facts and figures about humpback whales, a map of the migratory path of the humpback whale you adopted, a window decal/sticker, monthly updates and recent WDC newsletters including updates on where the adopted whale has been seen and how this adoption is helping to save whales and dolphins worldwide.


You'll receive through the mail: A personalized certificate which has a photograph of the adopted whale, A biography of the adopted whale, Family tree, Fascinating facts and figures about humpback whales, A map of the migratory path of the humpback whale you adopted, WDC window decal/sticker, Monthly updates on your adopted whale, Recent WDC newsletters which include updates on where the adopted whales have been seen and how this adoption is helping to save whales and dolphins worldwide, and an exciting and educational DVD featuring WDC adoptable humpback whales.


You'll receive through the mail: A personalized certificate which has a photograph of the adopted whale, A biography of the adopted whale, Family tree, Fascinating facts and figures about humpback whales, A map of the migratory path of the humpback whale you adopted, WDC window decal/sticker, Monthly updates on your adopted whale, Recent WDC newsletters which include updates on where the adopted whales have been seen and how this adoption is helping to save whales and dolphins worldwide.


You'll receive through the mail a personalized certificate with a photograph, biography and the family tree of Holly or Fife, fascinating facts and figures about orcas, a map of the migratory path of the orca whale you adopted, a window decal/sticker, monthly updates and recent WDC newsletters including updates on where the adopted whale has been seen and how this adoption is helping to save whales and dolphins worldwide.


Support our work to study and protect whales and other ocean wildlife by adopting a humpback whale today. Oceanic Society is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and your tax-deductible symbolic whale adoption supports our ocean conservation programs.


CRC-12028, known as Muvi, is a humpback whale often seen along the California coast, including twice at the Farallon Islands during Oceanic Society whale watching trips. Muvi was first photographed in September 2005 in Monterey Bay, California and has been spotted 12 times altogether from as far north as Mendocino, California south to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Humpbacks in the eastern Pacific population regularly migrate between northern feeding areas and southern breeding grounds.


CRC-11815, known as Howard, is a humpback whale that visits the California coast in the summer and early fall, along with other humpbacks in the eastern Pacific population that regularly migrate between feeding areas in the north and breeding grounds in the south. Howard was first spotted in July 2004 near California's Año Nuevo State Park. Howard has been seen a total of 17 times, ranging from Monterey Bay, California and the Farallon Islands (where we identified it), to Puerto Vallarta and Oaxaca, Mexico.


CRC-15384 is a humpback whale that was first identified in September 2011 near the California/Oregon border, and has been seen two more times since. We spotted CRC-15384 near the Farallon Islands during a whale watching trip in July 2016, and it has also been photographed in the Gulf of California near Los Cabos, Mexico. Through future sightings of CRC-15384, we might be able to determine whether this whale is male or female.


CRC-15510, known as Eddie, is a humpback whale frequently seen in California, and has been spotted a whopping 53 times since October 2013. Eddie's flukes are nearly all black, with some distinctive white markings that make it easy to match in the catalog. In California, sightings of Eddie have predominantly been in Monterey Bay. We saw Eddie in the Gulf of the Farallones, off of San Francisco, along with around 25 other humpbacks during a spectacular day in August 2016. Like other whales in this population, Eddie travels south in the winter to reproduce and has been seen in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and Sonsonate, El Salvador.


Silky (CRC-10411) is a humpback whale that has been seen 30 times, most frequently along the northern California coast. Silky was first photographed in September 1993 just south of Half Moon Bay, California. Silky frequents Monterey Bay during the summer and fall, and has been seen by Oceanic Society at the Farallon Islands during fall trips. During winter migrations, Silky has been spotted near Cabo San Lucas, Mexico and as far south as Punatarenas, Costa Rica. Silky has distinctive flukes that are nearly all white toward the sides and all black in the middle.


HW-MN0502402 is a humpback whale calf born in late 2020 or early 2021 by another whale known as CRC-18245 (below). We photographed HW-MN0502402 off of San Francisco on October 17, 2021, where it was seen alongside its mom, CRC-18245. This was the first reported sighting of this whale! HW-MN0502402 was seen a month later in Monterey Bay. Humpback whale calves typically spend their first year at their mother's side. Seeing these two side by side was a rare opportunity to match this calf to its mother.


CRC-12260, known as Woody, was first identified in October 2006 when it was photographed in Monterey Bay, California. Woody has been spotted a total of nine total times, including by Oceanic Society in October 2021 off of Point Reyes National Seashore north of San Francisco. Woody has been seen in multiple areas of California, including Bodega Bay, Half Moon Bay and off of San Francisco. This beautiful humpback whale has dark, rounded flukes that are more compact than those of most other humpbacks.


CRC-15228 has been seen an impressive 28+ times since the first sighting in 2010 near the Farallon Islands, California, where we have also seen this whale in 2016 and 2021. Most sightings of CRC-15228 have been in Monterey Bay, a key feeding ground for this population of humpbacks. CRC-15228 has also been seen multiple times in Banderas Bay, near Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, during the winter. CRC-15228 has black flukes with large, white patches on both lobes, with linear and barnacle scars across their flukes.


CRC-15939, known as Waffles, was a calf when first spotted in February 2014 near the town of Barra de Potosi, Guerrero, Mexico. Waffles has been seen 35+ times since 2014, and has been identified as a female from research by NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. The most sightings of CRC-15939 have been in Monterey Bay, and we saw Waffles feeding near the Farallon Islands in August 2021. Waffles has a large jagged scar where her flukes meet the base of her peduncle. She also has multiple linear scars on the leading edge of her right fluke, likely from a killer whale attack!


From mid-May through November, New England Aquarium Whale Watches sail to Stellwagen Bank Marine Sanctuary, a rich feeding ground for whales, dolphins, sea birds and other marine creatures. Stellwagen is home to many species of large whales, including humpbacks, finbacks, and minkes, and the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale. New England Aquarium naturalists will share knowledge, answer your questions, and explain the fascinating behaviors of these truly magnificent mammals. Save 10% off Aquarium tickets when you buy combination tickets to the Whale Watch and the Aquarium on the Boston Harbor City Cruises website.


When the whales seemed calm enough, the crew flung the encircling nets, and quickly realized how many animals they faced: about 20 whales, adults and calves, frantically swam around inside the enclosure. Within minutes, the animals discovered escape routes and rushed to break free.


In 2003, a net encircled members of several pods of killer whales in Kamchatka waters. The hunters had no experience in capturing orcas, and as a result, several whales became entangled in the net. Video by Far East Russia Orca Project, courtesy of Erich Hoyt


Mike is the first offspring of Slick (J-16). He was named after the late Canadian scientist Dr. Michael Bigg who was known as the "father of killer whale research". Mike's living siblings are, Alki (J-36), and Echo (J-42). His youngest sibling, Scarlet (J-50), died before reaching age four. He is also an uncle to Alki's first offspring who lived just two-and-a half years.


Tsuchi is Blackberry's (J-27) sister. Her name comes from the Japanese word for "melon-headed whale," a North Pacific species of cetacean sometimes seen off the coast of Washington. Tsuchi's younger sibling is Mako (J-39). Tsuchi has been seen many times either in attendance with pregnant mothers or in attendance with new mothers. Her first known calf, Mintaka (no alpha-numeric) died in 2016. She had her second calf, Tofino (J-56), in May of 2019.


Mako's name derives from the Japanese "mako kujira" which means sperm whale. Mako has two siblings, Blackberry (J-27) and Tsuchi (J-31). He and Cookie (J-38) are about the same age, now both adults, their dorsal fins appear to have reached their full height. Mako became an uncle in May 2019 to Tofino (J-56).


Echo is the fourth known offspring of Slick (J-16). She has always been a very spunky whale. Echo is short for 'echolocation' which is what the whales use to navigate and forage. Within a three month span, Echo became a sister to Scarlet (J-50) and an aunt to Sonic (J-52). Both of these energetic young calves lived short lives. Echo has two remaining siblings, Mike (J-26) and Alki (J-36). 041b061a72


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